The Girl in a Pink Hijab

Posted August 25, 2013 no picture Arya Satya Nugraha

no picture Arya Satya Nugraha View Profile
Member since August 6, 2013
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Following cultural and religion rules does not have to be a barrier for a girl like Fike Kireina to go after her passion. Unlike girls in conservative groups who are oppressed to stay on domestic post, Fike's true calling is in leadership issue and so she has no reason to stay at home. For her, both boy and girl stand a chance to become a leader.



"I don't think that human right states who should be a leader and who should stay behind to follow. Everybody, boy or girl, is equal," Fike said. Her leadership experiences were gained when she led numerous team of organizing committees in school events. Just now, Fike flew to Brunei to attend a leadership forum with student leaders from all over Asia Pacific.


Fike is a portrait of today's muslim girl in Indonesia, a democratic country with the most muslim population in the world. She is not a typical girl in hijab (veils to cover hair for muslim women) as you previously thought of. Of all colors, she avoids monochromatic veils and chooses bright colors instead.


If you think Fike is an outlier, in some extent you may be true. But, you are also incorrect since girls in hijab are ubiquitous in top-tier universities in Indonesia. Some are not merely ordinary students they are student activists or the cremes of the school that have stolen trophies nationally and internationally.


What I try to convey here is when in some traditional Muslim communities women are 2nd class citizen but it is no such thing in Indonesia. As I wrote earlier, they have same access with men even for executive post in government.


After all the muslim community is a part of a larger international community. Hence the influence of so called global pop culture is inevitable. As Fike says, "I think pop culture is a symbol of human freedom. It represents a free sphere."


Just like other youth, Fike loves fashion. She mix-matches her hijab with eye candy outfit. It doesn't have to be expensive though. Yet it must represent her personality as a dynamic and outgoing girl. "Fashion is not only about what is on trend, it is more like a personal statement," said Fike.


Fike feels she was born with privilege that her country and family gives. She cherishes for the democracy in Indonesia and her family. It gives her a room to speak her mind up and to be a front runner of her generation without giving up in what she believes.


human rights Indonesia girls muslim community girls right leadership




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