Child Rights

Ludnie Cherlande Audat (centre) plays a clapping game with other girls in Centre d’Action pour le Developpement, a transit centre for children without parental care in Ganthier, town outside Port-au-Prince. © UNICEF/NYHQ2010-2626/Roger LeMoyne


What is the Convention on the Rights of the Child?


It has only been since 20 November 1989, when the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) that the world has benefited from one set of legal rights for all children and young people. Today, 193 States parties have ratified the Convention, making it the most widely ratified human rights agreement in the world.

A convention such as this is an agreement between people or countries where everyone agrees to follow the same law. The CRC spells out the range of rights to which children everywhere are entitled. It sets basic standards for children’s well-being at different stages of their development and is the first universal, legally binding code of child rights in history.

The Convention states that everyone under the age of 18 (the definition of a child), regardless of gender, origin, religion or possible disabilities, needs special care and protection because children are often the most vulnerable.

Although the Convention has 54 articles in all, it is guided by four fundamental principles:
  • Non-discrimination (article 2): You should neither benefit nor suffer because of your race, colour, gender, language, religion, or national, social or ethnic origin, or because of any political or other opinion; because of your caste, property or birth status; or because you are disabled.
  • The best interests of the child (article 3): Laws and actions affecting children should put your best interests first and benefit you in the best possible way.
  • Survival, development and protection (article 6): The authorities in your country must protect you and help ensure your full development – physical, spiritual, moral and social.
  • Participation (article 12): You have a right to have your say in decisions that affect you, and to have you opinions taken into account.

These are your rights.

Movie Review: 50/50

Movie Review: “50/50” “50/50”, inspired by the true story of its screenplay writer Will...

read more

Our Children

Corrugated iron shelters poverty. Cold smoke escapes cold bodies. Warmth is a luxury. Safety is a...

read more


stand_strong

"I will . Never give in to the stereotypes associated with young people . Promote the positive work...

read more

Ukraine: complicated and unstable situation in the ATO area

Weekly news digest (December 3 – 9) The situation in the ATO area remains complicated and...

read more


Do one thing!

Do one thing! I’ve been thinking about this urging affirmation for some time now, trying to figure out what I would like to urge people to do. And I reached the conclusion that I would like people to try and see things from others perspective. To begin with, this activity, of trying to w...

read more

Congratulations Malala! A young girl against Taliban.

Terrorism is hurting our world, it’s harming our children, and it’s killing us every day. Thou...

read more


MELODY OF LIFE

Life is like a melodious song waiting to be played or sung; Be it an elegy, Be it a lullaby,...

read more

Basketball Is Something That Anyone Can Enjoy With A Little Advice

Basketball is a game which is enjoyed by many people in many countries. Each player who plays it has certain skills that they perform in order to help their team win. If you want to take your game to the next level, the following tips should help. Bounce passes are important in the game of bas...

read more


Gender Equality. Then, Now and the Future.

Opened eyes, closed eyes. When I open my eyes, I can see the gender equality revolution. Suddenly...

read more

Why I Believe You Can Be a Human Rights Advocate

By age seventeen, Nam* had been forced into marrying a stranger, bearing his child, and risking he...

read more


show more