Child Labor and The Neverending Plague on Humanity

Publié 25 octobre 2013 no picture Kriyana Reddy

no picture Kriyana Reddy Voir le Profil
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I wrote a speech about Child Labor.

I had the opportunity to deliver to a group of people about two years ago in a competition sponsored by the Rotary Club. Although prizes and medallions were far from the glitz of this serious event, I wanted to share with you all my speech. It is, perhaps, one of the most passionate addresses I've given, regardless of the text which lies so banally on this blank screen. Let me know what you think!

Child Labor and the Never Ending Plague of National Instability

Food, water, shelter, clothing and a generous donation from your parent’s wallet to the “I need this money to buy something from the vending machine” foundation which I’m sure you all are very familiar with. Well, as adolescents of the new and improved twenty-first century America, we as somewhat mindless teenagers can ask and go as we please as most of us know our parents will rarely ever tell us to discover the path to ‘financial enlightenment’ through some hard labor. As never having to compare our lives with those of someone in China, India, Guatemala (You name it!) and this is what I will be speaking about today. Child Labor. Plain, simple, you understand what it means with the use of two words but you see, the impact of this term to society is far greater than what you see and hear in two simple words. Why would someone like me be attracted to something of such high caliber foreign affairs, you may ask? The reason is quite interesting. This previous summer, I visited my family in Hyderabad, India. India can be given some likeliness to New York City as you’ll rarely ever find parking lots or suburban neighborhoods. Instead of shopping malls or grocery complexes, you find street bazaars and within a matter of days, you learn to be acquainted with its quaint charm. While visiting a shoe selling establishment, cultures diverge as in India, tradition shows that shoes will be fitted to your feet as you will be treated like a guest rather than a customer. The very employee who helped me with my selection was coincidentally a girl of my same age. Wow. Tattered clothes and unkempt hair with the strange emotion that she was privileged to have the job, she fled to her oasis behind the counter.

In this terrifying aspect of what a country resorts to do when acting upon their national well being, neither gender nor age are factors of what it means to be a victim of ‘child labor’. Some statistics taken in 20ll show that nearly 40% of children raised in Africa, India, and other developing countries are forced to commit themselves to the tasks of an adult that would be a primary source of money. Poverty-stricken countries are the main supporters of such vile and intolerable punishment but in some sincerity, we should ask ourselves, “What in life could bring about this great wave of suffering and torment for children?” In some layman’s terms, we can investigate the unemployment rates (those of adults) in those very places I mentioned before and uncover the fact that unemployment in India is 10% as of 2011, in China is 7%, and in much of Africa is 24%. Now, which of these is considered the most gruesome of its class? Africa. With this, we can conclude that in final fact, Child labor rates increase with national unemployment rates. Ha. No? Not something to laugh about? Certainly not.

Programs such as the International Program for the Elimination of Child Labor (IPEC) and the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) are gaining a forefront as we speak on this cause. Launching new and improved campaigns every day, the organizations need your support to gain strong ground for this growing epidemic.

We’ve achieved so much throughout the human race but with your support, we’re determined to end child labor altogether. Join the Movement today. Thank you.


children education human rights global safety rights labor you me change danger child illegal prohibited activist human lives risk living




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