Blindness

Posted June 15, 2011 no picture

Member since June 15, 2011
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Almost everyday you're seen everywhere , whether your sleeping in streets , begging , or doing anything that's referred to as being '' normal '' in this society . How many times do we cross streets a day seeing one of you standing on a pavement begging for some money ? And , how often do we just pass you by without even noticing that you 're standing there all alone in the only place you regard as your home ? .

What do your faces reflect but the bitterness of the life you're living , lost hope wandering somewhere where you can't find it . Negativity surrounding you like a dark cloud that follows you no matter where you go . You may cry or weep , but whether you're crying silently or not makes absolutely no difference for there are no ears ready to hear you crying , there are no hearts ready to feel your tears falling down , no hearts ready to feel a weeping heart . No human beings ready to acknowledge the human spirit they share with you .

We may not know you , but we blindly know that you can't be trusted . Is it you that we don't want to see , or don't we want to see what our ignorance has done to you ! . We just point fingers at you , mistreat you when you beg for some money , call you names when you bother us . We tell our children not to talk to you because you are a '' street child'' . we don't see you in our children and we don't see our children in you .

We see you in our daily lives , we don't bother asking you about anything , we don't even try to talk to you . But at the end of a day , we go home , back to our families , or only back to our apartments , take a warm bath , put our heads on a pillow and fall into a deep sleep . When we wake up after that , we are awake , but awake with a sleeping conscience ..

Photo © UNICEF/NYHQ2010-2481/Michael Kamber Adolescent boys rest on the street where they live and work, in Marcory, a neighbourhood in the city of Abidjan. They are waiting for their workday to begin. They are among dozens of boys, aged 8 to 20, who live on the surrounding streets, doing restaurant work and odd jobs to survive.




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