No bad news, please

Posted March 20, 2011 User_image_bg Sergeyevich


Researchers tracked 102,000 Twitter users over six months, analysing the 140-character-or-less text from 129 million of their tweets with standard techniques from psychology. Specifically, they measured the emotional content of the tweets as reflected in the presence of positive or negative words from a lexicon previously established by psychologists. From this they could assess the "subjective well-being" of the users through their tweets. The researchers indeed found that happier people - those recording a high subjective well being - tended to be tweeting and receiving tweets from people who were also happier. The same was true for those who were less happy.

Source: http://www.newscientist.com/blogs/onepercent/2011/...

Researchers tracked 102,000 Twitter users over six months, analysing the 140-character-or-less text from 129 million of their tweets with standard techniques from psychology. Specifically, they measured the emotional content of the tweets as reflected in the presence of positive or negative words from a lexicon previously established by psychologists. From this they could assess the "subjective well-being" of the users through their tweets. The researchers indeed found that happier people - those recording a high subjective well being - tended to be tweeting and receiving tweets from people who were also happier. The same was true for those who were less happy.

Source: http://www.newscientist.com/blogs/onepercent/2011/03/happy-people-tweet-together.html

New Scientist writes that researchers found that happy people follow and retweet other happy people on Twitter while unhappy users communicate with others of the same disposition. What does it tell us about our society as a whole? That we don't want to listen to others moan about their problems instead of happy news, like friends getting married or having babies. No bad news for us, please!




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